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    Why are these hotel confirmations “irksome to the extreme”?

Why are these hotel confirmations “irksome to the extreme”?

Sometimes, even environmentally-conscious companies have ridiculous policies. Here's a Marriott story.
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    How ridiculous are these Virgin Atlantic seat reservation fees?

How ridiculous are these Virgin Atlantic seat reservation fees?

This case underscores the sound reasoning behind the federal government's decision to force airlines to disclose these so-called "options" for air travelers in a proposed new regulation.
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    With these fees, it’s not necessarily better in the Bahamas

With these fees, it’s not necessarily better in the Bahamas

For the fiscal 2014/15 year, the Bahamas expects to collect $125 million in tourism taxes. Where are they going?

What the &#** is wrong with loyalty programs?

Loyalty programs must be more tightly regulated by law, and in some cases, banned outright. Fortunately, there's some good news on that front.

Maybe I should have checked out Roomstays before I booked?

When Patrick LaPella says he made a “complete mess” of his hotel reservations in Covington, KY., you should take him at his word.

Who really benefits from airline codesharing?

It’s one of those unaskable questions in the travel industry, akin to challenging church dogma.

Why don’t airlines enforce their carry-on baggage rules?

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Why won’t American Airlines take my money?

I find it odd that American could tell a passenger that the award miles he'd earned as the result of giving his loyalty and business to the airline were somehow worth less than cash, and indeed, are worthless.

When Congress swallows a big lie

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Are airlines pulling a bait-and-switch?

I receive regular missives from readers about disappearing prices, most commonly airfares. Technology experts blame the problem on caching, or storing the fares to make them faster to access online. They say that caching sometimes allows a fare to show as available when it’s already purchased. But once you try to book it, the system will return an error and point you to the next available fare, which is usually more expensive.