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What you need to know this week

Travelers United is here! We will officially launch our membership organization for travelers on Monday, June 23. We hope you can join us on this journey.

We are over 126,000 signatures in our online campaign! Remember that Change.org petition that asks Congress to keep truth-in-advertising laws in place? Please help us reach the next milestone: 250,000 signatures. If you haven’t added your name yet, please consider doing so now.

Want to help save the world? Sure you do. So why not join Travelers United as a volunteer? We need anyone with a strong desire to help make the world a better place. Here’s how to get involved.

The latest from Consumer Traveler

Maybe I should have checked out Roomstays before I booked?
When Patrick LaPella says he made a “complete mess” of his hotel reservations in Covington, KY., you should take him at his word.

Guess who’s subsidizing those free tickets
Most premium travel is written off for hefty tax deductions. Business class and first class get written off together with travel luxuries. It doesn’t seem fair when working class citizens get stuck making up the resulting budget deficits.

Are hotel towel “reuse” programs saving the environment — or the bottom line?
Hotels trumpet how they want guests’ help in conserving water by forgoing changing towels and sheets. I don’t know about you, but I can’t help but think it’s nothing more than a euphemism for “Save Our Bottom Line” — at least for many hotels I’ve used.

What’s better for traveling in Europe — train or rental car?
The truth is, there’s no “best way” to travel through Europe. Sometimes it’s better to rent a car, and sometimes it’s better to hop on the train. Here are 10 European travel situations, with advice on which way to go.

Ouch, those cuts really hurt, United!
Thank you for reading Consumer Traveler’s weekly newsletter. You can subscribe to our daily email newsletter here.

When are passengers going to see new air traffic control benefits?
Though technology has changed for the rest of the world, our aviation system is still mired in the past. As many may or may not know, the air traffic control system in America is cobbled together with a collection of 1950 and 1960 technology.

Let’s talk

We’re listening. The stories you see in this newsletter are just a starting point. We hope you’ll take a minute to leave a comment, whether you agree or disagree with something we’ve written. Let’s continue the conversation on Twitter or Facebook. And, of course, we’re always available by email. Here’s our address.