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Upgraded denied boarding and lost luggage compensation

There are only a few cases, under US Department of Transportation regulations, where passengers actually get compensated by airlines. One is when baggage is delayed or lost, and the second is when airlines deny passengers boarding because of overbooking.


Do we really want DOT making cell rules for airlines?

Since the prospect of making cell phone calls is now possible, the initial reaction from the flying public has been dramatically anti-cell-phone-use. Comments filed with the Department of Transportation from consumers support a firm rule of no-cell-phone-calls aboard aircraft. Some airlines have promised they will never allow cell phone calls on plane. Please read through […]


Tell us how much it costs! Passenger poll shows frustration with airline fee disclosure

In a poll conducted by Travelers United in response to requests from the Department of Transportation (DOT) Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) more than 2,600 consumers dramatically responded loud and clear, “Tell us how much it costs!” The poll was distributed to this blog; sent to be distributed to readers of other travel blogs like […]


When airlines misrepresent the truth to you and Congress

This is an outline of basic consumer objections to the current bill, Airfares Transparency Act of 2014 (HR4156), that emerged from the House Transportation Committee with no comments, no discussion and no hearings. There is no need for this bill and significant economic and consumer-protection harms that will come from passage of such a bill. […]


House Commitee moves for new airfare law with no hearings, excluding consumers from process

A previous post noted that the Chairman of the House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee had introduced the Transparent Airfares Act of 2014. This is a reprint of our earlier story about this misguided bill designed to make airfares more confusing. The committee just announced yesterday afternoon that it would bring this bill to “mark-up” tomorrow, […]


Airlines still fighting full fare advertising. New legislation moves consumer rights backwards

Yesterday, a group of Representatives introduced the Transparent Airfares Act of 2014. This bill is a major step backwards for consumers and the sponsors of this bill, from both sides of the aisle, have simply not thought through what they are proposing. And, the airline lobbyists, intent on finding ways to make airline pricing more obscure, are flogging a dead horse that has been killed at least three times over the past three years.