Quantcast

Ned’s top smartphone general travel apps

Ned Levi has tested thousands of travel apps for both Android and iOS based smartphones. Here's a list of his current top general travel apps for smartphones.
By |August 12th, 2013|Columns|3 Comments|

Sunday musings: Do the arts promote growth? Venice in Street View, car sharing startup

Today we ponder the role of "the arts" in a nation's budget. Is it a money-maker or should it be? Google uses backpacks to shoot videos of Venice for Street View. And, car-sharing Web startups begin making waves in the rental car and airport worlds.
By |July 28th, 2013|Today|1 Comment|

Emergency preparedness for cruise ship passengers

The Carnival Triumph passengers are home from their ordeal, but many unanswered question are still left. It's possible to learn from the passengers' experience to become better prepared to handle cruise emergencies. Ned Levi discusses concrete suggestions for cruise ship passengers to help them get through a cruise ship emergency at sea.
By |February 18th, 2013|Columns|7 Comments|

Weekend what we’re reading: Colorado ski resort pot, Google travel? holiday airline fees

This weekend we look at how newly passed marijuana laws passed in Colorado and Washington State might impact ski resorts. We look at the travel information served up by Google. And, Consumers Union urges airline travelers to understand the fees airlines are charging this holiday season.

By |December 22nd, 2012|Today|0 Comments|

What we’re reading: United’s first Dreamliner flight, Southwest flies through skydiving zone, Google’s field trip app

United announces first Dreamliner flight on November 4th, Southwest directed through skydiving zone by controllers, Google's field trip app take advantage of your surroundings

What we’re reading: Airlines are Googling you, ice cream road trip, five things to see in Bermuda

Airlines are Googling you to find out what you look like before you get to the airport

Like it or not, if you’ve ever posted anything online, anyone can most likely find out things about you just by searching for your name. Now one airline will start to Google your name once you’ve bought a ticket.
British Airways is launching its “know me” program in the U.K. and the U.S., where it will Google passengers’ faces so they know who you are once you arrive at the airport terminal. The airline will deploy your picture across the terminal to ticket agents and roaming customer service agents, hoping they spot you, then they intend to approach you and welcome you in person, face to face.

Do you trust GPS directions?

We’d entrusted our route to the Google Maps app on my iPhone; it had never steered us wrong. The program assured me that yes, the winding road between Santa Maria and Interstate 5 was the fastest, most direct route to our destination. It even showed me the gas stations along the way: a Texaco, an Exxon and a Chevron. Wrong on all counts.

Google’s little flight search problem

It isn’t difficult to imagine Google controlling most online travel purchases in the not-too-distant future. And until recently, I didn’t have an issue with that; after all, if Google can offer cheaper tickets or better flight options by cutting out the middleman, who cares?

Google shows its hand with Flight Search, the power of monopoly

Google Flight Search, at first only providing glimpses if itself if one searched for it has now come front and center. If anyone had any doubt that Google is skewing its "search" results to help itself, there cannot be any doubt now.
By |December 20th, 2011|Today|20 Comments|

Google excludes online travel agents from “Flight Search”

At the PhoCusWright Travel Conference in Hollywood, Florida, the VP for travel at Google announced that the search engine giant has decided to exclude online travel agencies such as Expedia, Priceline, Travelocity and metasearch sites like Kayak from their flight search results. A search on Google will only return airline results.
By |November 17th, 2011|Today|31 Comments|