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Weekend what we’re reading: 2013—Safest year, Sphere+Galileo=amazing photos, creeping airfares, DCA flight changes

This weekend, we look at safety in the airline industry, examine creeping airfares throughout the system and discover airline route changes that will come about because of the AA/US merger.
By |January 18th, 2014|Today|0 Comments|

8 moves that can help consumers if the AA/US merger is approved

If the Department of Justice (DOJ) and the Department of Transportation (DOT) decide to approve the merger of American Airlines and US airways, they should attach industry-wide consumer-focused conditions to the approval.
By |February 15th, 2013|Today|5 Comments|

What we’re reading: Michael Jackson slot machine, green Marriott Indianapolis, apps let users complain about New York

New Michael Jackson slot machine, Marriott Indianapolis goes green, complaining apps now available for New York

Who owns airport slots? The American people or the airlines?

Airlines look upon landing and take-off slots as personal property. However, the airlines have not paid for these slots. They were distributed by the FAA back when the airspace was wide-open and air-traffic problems were not even envisioned. They belong to the public, not the airlines.
By |August 30th, 2010|Today|1 Comment|

What we’re reading: Fewer slots in Nevada casinos, AA mechanics reject contract, private jets for pets?

Fewer slots in Nevada casinos, AA mechanics reject labor contract, demand rises for private jet service for pets

Playing the slots – why all airlines’ weather delays are not created equal

Basically in a weather delay situation, ATC (Air Traffic Control) gives each airline a certain number of "slots" — i.e. how many planes they can land within a given time. Each airline then prioritizes their flights accordingly.
By |June 1st, 2010|Today|4 Comments|

What we’re reading: AA inspects 737s, Ryanair CEO says “go away”, marketers say reduce slot holds in Vegas

American Airlines took three of their Boeing 737s out of service last week and will inspect its remaining fleet after a routine audit found scratches on the planes.