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    Consumers say “No” to increases in government fees and taxes on air travel

Consumers say “No” to increases in government fees and taxes on air travel

Travelers United outlines its objections to increases in passenger facility charges, that fund airports from passengers, and to increases in other government fees like customs and agriculture inspection fees.

Newsletter – March 8, 2015

This week's neswsletter — taxes and fees fight on Capitol Hill, frequent flier programs, bad maintenance, rental car deals, and unmanned aircraft systems.
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    Do we need to pay more taxes to support airports? I don’t think so.

Do we need to pay more taxes to support airports? I don’t think so.

Proposed increases in airport passenger facility charges from $4.50 to $8 are not necessary or justified. Consumer groups are fighting this increase in aviation taxes.

In 2015 tell consumers the whole truth about travel costs

Truth is the New Years resolution that Travelers United works every day to fulfill with legislators, regulators and the travel industry honchos. Clear pricing allows travel consumers to comparison shop.

Airlines howl about taxes, but they don’t pay them

As we come into the holiday season when the spirit of giving spreads across the world, airlines are doing all of the taking and none of the gift-giving. Their plans are being hatched to give even less in the future.
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    Airlines give thanks. Average passengers? Not so much. Part 2

Airlines give thanks. Average passengers? Not so much. Part 2

Airlines pack more passengers into planes, reduce the value of their frequent flier programs, hide airfares and fees, and shift the tax burden to passengers.

Does Airbnb.com need regulating?

It is not easy being a disrupter, organized to share, when it comes to long-established, highly regulated businesses like hotels and taxis.

When airlines misrepresent the truth to you and Congress

An airline pricing bill, passed out of the House committee, is based on two major prevarications. Here's the scoop and a petition already with 35,000 names that will help consumers fight back.

What are our representatives thinking? Legalizing drip pricing is madness

The House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee passed what they mistakenly, or cynically, call the Airfares Transparency Act of 2014. These representatives listed below decided to strip consumer protections against misleading and deceptive pricing by airlines.
By |April 25th, 2014|Today|0 Comments|

Are airlines being held to a different advertising standard than other consumer products industries?

Airlines assert that a U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) requirement that they prominently display the full price of an airline ticket (base fare, taxes, fees) in a print or online advertisement treats them differently than other industries. They are correct. There is a reason. They are treated differently on many different levels.
By |April 11th, 2014|Today|2 Comments|